Editorial Board Q & A – AM Rounds http://academicmedicineblog.org Beyond the pages of Academic Medicine, journal of the AAMC Tue, 19 Sep 2017 13:54:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.2 72453062 Editorial Board Q&A: John Paul Sanchez, MD, MPH http://academicmedicineblog.org/editorial-board-qa-john-paul-sanchez-md-mph/ Thu, 17 Aug 2017 18:15:26 +0000 http://academicmedicineblog.org/?p=3493 JPREVISED3

John Paul Sanchez, MD, MPH, Assistant Dean, Diversity and Inclusion, Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, President, Building the Next Generation of Academic Physicians Inc.

Describe your current activities. 

My workweek is split between patient care in the emergency department, leading various diversity and inclusion efforts across the medical school (from high school students to faculty members), overseeing the Community-Engaged Service Learning elective, and research related to diversifying the academic medicine workforce.

What gaps do you see in the current academic medicine scholarship?

Gaps in the current academic medicine scholarship include best practices and evaluations of initiatives and programs to enhance diversity and inclusion in the physician workforce and the academic medicine workforce.

Name two to three seminal Academic Medicine articles that everyone in your field should read.

What issues will we be reading about in Academic Medicine in five years? 

I’m looking forward to reading more Academic Medicine articles on:

  1. Diverse pioneers of academic medicine, whether they represent education, service or research.
  2. The history and impact of medical organizations (for example, AAMC, NHMA, NMA, AMA, LMSA, SNMA, GLMA) in facilitating change at our academic health centers, especially in improving learner and patient outcomes.
  3. On-going and emerging health policy topics and how to become more effective health advocates.
  4. Strategies to promote diverse trainees interest and preparedness for academic medicine careers.

What book(s) are you reading right now? 

I enjoy taking my students and mentees to the summer Shakespearean performances in Central Park, NYC.  In preparation for the 2017 shows, I’ve been re-reading A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Julius Ceasar.

]]>
3493
Editorial Board Q&A: Grace Huang, MD http://academicmedicineblog.org/editorial-board-qa-grace-huang-md/ Mon, 19 Jun 2017 19:45:44 +0000 http://academicmedicineblog.org/?p=3440 Grace Huang Lori Newman 20160411 001

Grace Huang, MD, Editor-in-Chief of MedEdPORTAL, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, hospitalist at Beth Israel Deaconess, Director of the Rabkin Fellowship in Medical Education, Co-Director of the BIDMC Academy, and Associate Program Director in Internal Medicine

Describe your current activities. 

I have a marvelously multifaceted career, and its common threads are mentorship and scholarship. My faculty development roles allow me to cultivate the careers of faculty members seeking to excel as educators and leaders. For our residency program, I am responsible for resident evaluation and remediation, which is hard, meaningful work. I am the new Editor-in-Chief of MedEdPORTAL, which gives me the privilege of witnessing and shaping the innovative teaching efforts of faculty around the world. As an investigator, I am studying critical thinking, cognitive bias, high value care, and most recently, physician wellness.  Lastly, but not least, my clinical function as a hospitalist reminds me constantly of our ultimate mission as healers.

What gaps do you see in the current academic medicine scholarship?

I’ve always cherished the function of peer review. But my editorial role has given me an intimate window on its beauty…and where it falls short. I entered the position at MedEdPORTAL hoping to better explore the concept of “scholarship on scholarship” and to understand how we can build on a time-honored establishment and take it to the next level.

Name two to three seminal Academic Medicine articles that everyone in your field should read.

What issues will we be reading about in Academic Medicine in five years? 

As the interface between teacher and learner continues to blur, we will be reading more about peer learning and student-as-teacher programs.

We will fully recognize the power of simulation and will use it routinely for high stakes assessment.

Lastly, I pray in 5 years we will be reading about what we learned in conquering physician burnout.

What book(s) are you reading right now? 

I really ought to read more of the kind of books that would inform my work but I tend toward escapist literature instead. I just finished Seveneves by Neal Stephenson. This book spans millennia, beginning with the premise that the fragmentation of the moon into 7 parts will lead eventually to a meteoric shower that destroys the earth. How the world grapples with this inevitability is only the first half of the book…

]]>
3440
Editorial Board Q&A: Anthony R. Artino Jr, PhD http://academicmedicineblog.org/editorial-board-qa-anthony-r-artino-jr-phd/ Tue, 09 May 2017 20:35:10 +0000 http://academicmedicineblog.org/?p=3385 Artino (002) (003)Anthony R. Artino Jr, PhD, professor, Department of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland

Describe your current activities. 

I’m a Professor of Medicine and Deputy Director for Graduate Programs in Health Professions Education at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. I am also a Captain in the U.S. Navy with just over 20 years of active-duty service. In my current role, I’m responsible for teaching, research, and administrative leadership. In terms of research, most recently I’ve worked with several colleagues to explore responsible research practices in academic medicine and the use of alternative metrics to help researchers gauge how their work is disseminated outside of traditional publications (e.g., posts on weblogs and tweets on Twitter). Keep your eye out for a couple of upcoming papers on these topics in Academic Medicine!

What gaps do you see in the current academic medicine scholarship?

One of the biggest gaps I see in academic medicine is knowledge translation (or lack thereof). In other words, I think we need more work that explores the role of medical education research in medical education practice. Academic medicine is a growing field, and evidence from our research has provided new insights into how and why certain learning strategies and interventions work, while others do not. Despite this growth of knowledge, many medical educators still don’t consult the research literature when making decisions about curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Some of the research questions I think we need to explore include: Why don’t we have more knowledge translation in the field, and what can we do to promote knowledge uptake and application?

Name two to three seminal Academic Medicine articles that everyone in your field should read.

That’s a tough one, but if I had to pick just a couple, I would probably go with David Cook’s 2005 article entitled “The Research We Still Are Not Doing: An Agenda for the Study of Computer-Based Learning.” In this article, David reiterates a caution that scholars in the field of educational technology have long argued – the idea that it makes no sense to conduct so-called “media-comparison studies,” where researchers compare instruction in one type of media to instruction in another. Such studies are hopelessly confounded, and David does a nice job articulating this argument and calling for more rigorous research.

I also really enjoyed reading the recent article by Elaine Van Melle and her co-authors. The article, entitled “Using Contribution Analysis to Evaluate Competency-Based Medical Education Programs: It’s All about Rigor in Thinking,” is still in the published-ahead-of-print category, and so it’s a little too new to be considered “seminal.” Nonetheless, it’s quite fascinating and, in my opinion, should be required reading for anyone attempting to answer the ubiquitous question: “does my program work?”

What issues will we be reading about in Academic Medicine in five years? 

I hope we’ll be reading more articles that explore translational research efforts in academic medicine. We have to figure out how best to promote knowledge uptake and application. And like everything we do in medical education, the question of knowledge translation should be studied in a systematic way. I’m also hopeful that over the next few years the quality of our measurement tools in medical education will improve, particularly the survey instruments used for research purposes. In some of our most recent work, we’ve found major problems related to the quality of the individual items found in published survey tools.

What book(s) are you reading right now? 

Actually, I don’t do a ton of “reading for fun.” I do, however, listen to lots of audio books. Three of my recent favorites are Greg McKeown’s Essentialism, David Brooks’ The Road to Character, and Angela Duckworth’s Grit. I’m also a big fan of podcasts. Truth be told, I’m slightly obsessed. Some of my favorites are Malcolm Gladwell’s Revisionist History, NPR’s How I Built This, Planet Money, and Invisibilia, and Stephen Dubner and Steven Levitt’s Freakonomics Radio. If you ever need to pass the time on a long trip, these podcasts are just what the doctor ordered.

]]>
3385
Editorial Board Q&A: Frederic W. Hafferty, PhD http://academicmedicineblog.org/editorial-board-qa-frederic-w-hafferty-phd/ Thu, 27 Oct 2016 19:27:21 +0000 http://academicmedicineblog.org/?p=3187 fred-haffertyFrederic W. Hafferty, PhD, professor of medical education, Division of General Internal Medicine and Program in Professionalism and Values, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

Describe your current activities. 

I continue to try to locate boundaries and then push against the limits of my thinking and my imagination (not the same thing). Right now I am trying to reconcile how organizations and institutions (not the same thing for sociologists) function as sites of cultural reproduction versus cultural agitation. As ideal types, reproduction leads to stagnation while agitation to chaos. As such, both organizations (e.g., medical schools) and institutions (e.g., medical education) are challenged to both preserve and persevere in changing times. How this plays out in medical education remains a fascinating tension for me. Right now, my most recent Academic Medicine thinking on this topic can be found in the 2016 article “Alternative Framings, Countervailing Visions: Locating the “P” in Professional Identity Formation” written with colleagues/friends Barret Michalec, Tina Martimianakis, and Jon Tilburt.

What gaps do you see in the current academic medicine scholarship?

My bias–and this dates back to my graduate student heroes Sam Bloom and Eliot Freidson–is that I tend to look for and then read articles on medicine and medical education from organizational and social structural perspectives, and thus, in turn, never feel that there is enough being published at this level of analysis.

Name two to three seminal Academic Medicine articles that everyone in your field should read.

I tend to be captivated by titles and always try to begin my own writing with (what I imagine to be) a pithy titular lead. One of my favorites is the medical anthropologist Janelle Taylor and her 2003 piece “Confronting ‘Culture’ in Medicine’s ‘Culture of No Culture’.” Absolutely delicious. So too is Catherine Lucy and Chip Souba’s 2010 “The Problem With the Problem of Professionalism.” A good title “makes” me want to read the article. A good title also guarantees (for me) provocative content. There are, of course, many more examples from Academic Medicine, but these are the first two that came to mind.

Finally, and although not an Academic Medicine piece, my all time favorite hidden curriculum title is “Blinded by Belonging: Revealing the Hidden Curriculum” by Susan Phillips. Although I had never met the author, I wrote her to express both admiration and jealousy. I wish I had been creative enough to front such a framing.

What issues will we be reading about in Academic Medicine in five years? 

Part of my answer lies above–more work at the levels of social and structural analysis–but I confess that this question was the hardest (and last I tried) to answer. Editors shape the journal, as they should, and each, my first being Addeane Caelleigh who empathically worked with me on my first Academic Medicine publication, has brought a different vision to the journal. I guess I’d rather be surprised than predictive.

What book(s) are you reading right now? 

The work/fun distinction is a narrow space for me. On the fiction side, I tend to be a streak reader and now I am non-systematically working my way through the writings of Walter Mosley, who situates many of his fiction characters within the social architecture of inner city post-War II LA . It is an alien world to me, one filled with community and a sense of connectedness along with the omnipresent lurking of a white power establishment and its agents of subjugation. In this same obsessive swoop, I just finished all of John Connolly’s works, an Irish writer who intersects the detective and the spiritual. Connolly’s book jacket claims he is a “genre of one.” I concur. What a wonderful moniker.

As for non-fiction, I have pushed my reading into the topic areas of unconscious bias and microaggressions and how these largely social-psychological framings intersect with the more social-structural framings of the hidden curriculum. Bridging these two domains is an interesting challenge.

]]>
3187
Editorial Board Q&A: Bridget C. O’Brien, PhD http://academicmedicineblog.org/editorial-board-qa-bridget-c-obrien-phd/ Tue, 14 Jun 2016 15:33:12 +0000 http://academicmedicineblog.org/?p=3070 O'Brien Headshot 2015 copy

Bridget O’Brien, PhD, associate professor, Department of Medicine, and educational researcher, Center for Faculty Educators, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine

Describe your current activities.
I am very broadly interested in questions related to workplace learning. This is a huge topic, but one that gives me lots of flexibility in the topics I study and the methods I choose, which I like. Much of my current work focus is on interprofessional education and practice. I’ve examined learning opportunities in primary care huddles, during standardized patient activities, and through quality improvement projects.

I do have an article that should be coming out soon in Academic Medicine – “Systems-Oriented Workplace Learning Experiences for Early Learners: Three Models.” [Editor’s Note: This article is now available online.] We used a qualitative case study design to examine student’s experiences and contributions to systems improvement efforts in a variety of clinical settings. We hope the models will be helpful for educators who are designing similar types of experiences for early learners.

What gaps do you see in the current academic medicine scholarship?
There are a few areas in which I would like to see more research:

1. Organizational and policy studies. I haven’t seen a great deal of research at this level, but I see health care systems and universities as a key factor in education. I think there are many yet to be tapped opportunities to understand more about educational programs, innovations, policies, etc. through comparative analysis of educational institutions and systems.

2. Observational research. This type of research is resource-intensive and labor-intensive, but provides so much insight into educational processes. It really helps us understand how learning occurs–what kinds of interactions among learners, among learners and educators and patients, between learners/educator and technologies, etc.

3. I would love to see research that examines education and educational activities from a design perspective. For example, how does the design of physical space affect learning? How does the design of virtual spaces affect learning?

Name two to three seminal Academic Medicine articles that everyone in your field should read.
There are several terrific RIME Review papers that synthesize theories and conceptual frameworks relevant to core topics in medical education. These are terrific contributions to the literature and an excellent model for doctoral students who are writing reviews as part of their dissertation.

What issues will we be reading about in Academic Medicine in five years?
I hope we’ll be reading more evidence that education is improving our health care system (reducing errors, making health care more accessible, improving quality of care).

What book(s) are you reading right now?
Originals: How Non-conformists Move the World by Adam Grant–I was intrigued when I heard him describe the Myers–Briggs as a fun exercise with no predictive validity or practical utility. Beyond that, it’s a great read about successful (and unsuccessful) ideas.

]]>
3070
Editorial Board Q&A: Lauren A. Maggio, PhD, MS (LIS) http://academicmedicineblog.org/editorial-board-qa-lauren-a-maggio-phd-ms-lis/ Tue, 19 Apr 2016 14:21:13 +0000 http://academicmedicineblog.org/?p=3001 Lauren Maggio headshotLauren A. Maggio, PhD, MS (LIS), associate professor of medicine, and associate director of distributed learning and technology for graduate programs in health professions education, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland

Describe your current activities.
I recently joined the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) as an associate professor where I am collaborating with a fantastic team of educators to launch a master’s and doctoral degree in health professions education (HPE) for members of the military health system. I also teach and conduct research in HPE.

As a researcher with a background in HPE and information science, I’m interested in exploring how to effectively connect health professionals, learners, and patients with information through the design of educational initiatives and by facilitating access to knowledge for public and professional use. This interest has led me to lead several studies in evidence-based medicine, including a few recently published in Academic Medicine.

Also in my new role, I am excited to undertake research on the nature of HPE graduate programs and to better understand how we can teach the responsible conduct of HPE research.

What gaps do you see in the current academic medicine scholarship? 
Over the past ten years, there has been an explosion of HPE research. While this provides unprecedented access to evidence, I don’t think we have yet addressed how to train educators to manage this influx of evidence or to effectively translate this knowledge into their practice.

Name two to three seminal Academic Medicine articles that everyone in your field should read.
Calls for Reform of Medical Education by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: 1910 and 2010 by Irby, Cook, and O’Brien. This article does a great job of reminding readers of the past and providing strong suggestions for the future. While not necessarily seminal articles, in each issue of Academic Medicine I always check out the AM Last Page. I often recommend the AM Last Page to my colleagues and learners who want a bite-sized introduction to key HPE topics.

What issues will we be reading about in Academic Medicine in five years? 
I hope we will be reading about the continued growth of HPE scholarship, robust funding for its creation, and effective methods for translating HPE knowledge into practice.

What books are you reading right now?
Right now, I’m getting ready to teach a qualitative methods course, so besides pouring over lots of qualitative textbooks, I am also re-reading Parker Palmer’s The Courage to Teach.

]]>
3001
Editorial Board Q&A: Colin P. West, MD, PhD http://academicmedicineblog.org/editorial-board-qa-colin-p-west-md-phd/ Tue, 16 Feb 2016 11:47:09 +0000 http://academicmedicineblog.org/?p=2949 Cropped West photo

Colin P. West, MD, PhD, professor of medicine, medical education, and biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, and statistical editor of Academic Medicine

Describe your current activities.

I’ve been an associate program director for the internal medicine residency at Mayo for several years, with particular responsibility for resident scholarship. I work closely with residents in their continuity clinics as well. I also developed and direct the evidence-based medicine curriculum for Mayo Medical School and teach courses on systematic reviews and clinical decision-making in the Mayo Graduate School.

My research activities are oriented around medical education, including career plans and physician well-being. The latter area involves medical students and practicing physicians as well. I’m increasingly involved in collaborative contributions, such as Academic Medicine’s recent Review Criteria for Research Manuscripts, Second Edition.

Clinically, I am a general internist with a focus on coordination of care for complex patients referred into the Mayo system. I maintain a small continuity practice as well, but the bulk of my clinical activity is either working with residents or in the referral setting.

What gaps do you see in the current academic medicine scholarship?

For me, the main need in academic medicine scholarship is continued commitment to increasing the rigor with which educational research is conducted. The field is far beyond where it was even 10 years ago in this regard, but we need to press forward. I’m more concerned with academic research prioritizing high-quality research rather than promoting research in any particular area. I think the important questions will get addressed by engaged scholars, so we should make sure their work moves us forward with sound evidence.

Name two or three seminal Academic Medicine articles that everyone in your field should read.

It’s impossible to narrow the “must-read” list down so far, so I’ll just highlight a couple of papers I come back to personally again and again. The first is “Beyond curriculum reform: Confronting medicine’s hidden curriculum” by Fred Hafferty (1998;73:403-407). Despite shining a light on the dark side of medical training, we continue to struggle to strike the balance between growth-promoting educational stress and cynicism-promoting negative role modeling. In some ways, my research work on distress and burnout builds on Dr. Hafferty’s early recognition of the training environment as an intervenable source of adverse experiences for learners.

Another paper highlighting professionalism in medical training is Maxine Papadakis’s 2004 paper, “Unprofessional behavior in medical school is associated with subsequent disciplinary action by a state medical board” (2004;79:244-249). Although cited unprofessional behaviors were fairly uncommon, their link to future professional lapses affirms the importance of efforts to effectively promote professionalism as part of the medical education experience.

What issues will we be reading about in Academic Medicine in five years?

In keeping with my response to an earlier question, I’m less concerned with specific topics than I am with hoping to read methodologically rigorous, high-quality papers across all topics. I anticipate continued attention to training for competency and how we ensure competency as a basic standard while also aspiring to excellence. Perhaps I’m biased, but I also think we will see continued attention to physician well-being and efforts to turn the tide of negativity sweeping our profession. We are only recently beginning to appreciate the role of our systems of training and practice in these problems, but these insights should allow innovative system-based solutions to develop much like what the quality improvement movement has triggered for patient safety.

What books are you reading right now?

I don’t often read “serious” or work-related books, honestly. Recent authors I’ve been reading include Jo Nesbo, Cormac McCarthy, and John le Carre, and I’ve also been re-reading the Game of Thrones books.

]]>
2949
Editorial Board Q&A: Peter M. Fleischut, MD http://academicmedicineblog.org/editorial-board-qa-peter-m-fleischut-md/ Thu, 08 Oct 2015 13:07:50 +0000 http://academicmedicineblog.org/?p=2820 PMF photo

Peter M. Fleischut, MD, associate professor of anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, and attending anesthesiologist, New York–Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York.

1.  Describe your current activities.

I’m currently the founding director of the Center for Perioperative Outcomes (CPO) at Weill Cornell Medical College. The CPO encompasses methodological, statistical, and information technology resources within a single center to encompass operational efficiencies, quality, compliance, and outcomes research.

2. What gaps do you see in today’s scholarship?

Within current academic medicine, there is a lack of focus on innovative technologies to improve patient safety and engagement that will be key in a largely consumer-focused health care market. Curriculums should be adjusted to tie together how technology and research are not only important to science but also to the clinician and patient by assisting to identify best practices to improve patient outcomes and promote safety, quality, and satisfaction.

3. Why do you read Academic Medicine?

I read Academic Medicine to stay engaged with the training of our future leaders.

4. What issues will we be reading about in five years?

I hope we’ll be reading about innovation’s leaps and bounds and the changing educational landscape for training the doctors of the future.

5. What book(s) are you reading right now?

I’ve finally gotten around to reading The Patient Will See You Now by Eric Topol, MD, which has, of late, sparked many discussions about the future of health care, digital health, and the overall future of medicine.

]]>
2820
Editorial Board Q&A: Edward C. Halperin http://academicmedicineblog.org/editorial-board-qa-edward-c-halperin/ Thu, 13 Aug 2015 06:02:29 +0000 http://academicmedicineblog.org/?p=2729 Edward_HalperinFall_Winter2014
Edward C. Halperin, MD, MA, chancellor and chief executive officer, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York

1.  Describe your current activities.

I recently completed a detailed study of the impact of off-shore for-profit medical education on the access of U.S. schools to clinical clerkships. The results of this study will be published in an upcoming issue of Academic Medicine. My colleagues and I also recently completed an analysis of material that was alleged to have been ashes from the Dachau concentration camp crematoria. The ashes were brought back to the U.S. by a returning soldier after the war and stored for 60 years by his family. The analysis posed interesting biochemical and ethical issues.

My day job is chancellor and chief executive officer of New York Medical College. We have a school of medicine (MD, MS in Medical Ethics), school of health sciences (MPH, DPH, DPT, MS in Speech Pathology, MS in Biostatistics), and graduate school (MS, PhD). Our application for a new dental school is pending.

I also see patients as a radiation oncologist at Metropolitan Hospital in Harlem and at Westchester Medical Center, just north of New York City.

2. What gaps do you see in today’s scholarship?

Two gaps that come to mind are:

  • The US has a far better system for comparing the safety and efficacy of drug A to drug B than we do for analyzing the safety and efficacy of machine A to machine B. The tremendous personal and societal costs related to the introduction of robotic surgery, proton therapy for cancer, autologous bone marrow transplantation for adult female breast cancer, and pharmacogenetic testing as an alleged adjunct to prescribing drugs all remind us of our need to research and develop better systems for studying machines and technology – much like we have done for studying drugs.
  • We have a far better understanding of the factors in the medical school admissions and education processes that predict success in basic science medical education and performance on standardized tests than we do the factors that predict who will become a good doctor.

3. Why do you read Academic Medicine?

Academic Medicine is the best single source to learn what is new and important about operating the institutional structures for the generation, conservation, and dissemination of knowledge about the causes, prevention, and treatment of human disease and disability.

4. What issues will we be reading about in five years?

I hope we’ll be reading well done studies that demonstrate how technology allows us to:

  • Promote health in a more efficient, humane, and less costly manner, and
  • Educate the next generation of physicians better, faster, smarter, and cheaper.

I fear that we’ll be reading about how technology allows us to do things differently, but we’re not sure if it is better.

5. What book(s) are you reading right now?

I just finished The Great Partnership: Science, Religion, and the Search for Meaning by Jonathan Sacks. Now I am reading The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History by John M. Barry, and I am listening in the car to The World Was Never the Same: Events that Changed History by J. R. Fears.

]]>
2729
Editorial Board Q&A: Laura Roberts http://academicmedicineblog.org/editorial-board-qa-laura-roberts/ Tue, 23 Jun 2015 06:28:38 +0000 http://academicmedicineblog.org/?p=2696 Laura Roberts PhotoLaura Roberts, MD, chair of the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Katharine Dexter and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine

1. Describe your current activities.

My “day job” is service as the Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and as the Katharine Dexter and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine. As the chair of a major department at a prominent institution, I have the opportunity to work with wonderful colleagues and to oversee and grow many extraordinary academic and clinical programs. It is amazing to see the good that is accomplished every day by creative and dedicated people from many different disciplines who are at all stages of their professional lives.

I love my role as Chair for many reasons. Every day I feel I am helping the people around me to do work of genuine consequence and meaning. I also love serving shoulder-to-shoulder with other academic leaders who, like me, gravitate toward roles in which they assume responsibility, feel a sense of purpose in contributing to a greater whole, and take on decisions that demand rigor and integrity.

I take seriously the responsibility that the field of academic medicine has in our world. We are entrusted with creating the path to a better future through advancing science of importance to human health, through innovation in clinical care and systems of care, by educating scientists and clinicians across diverse disciplines, by engaging with communities to address the hardest problems we face in real-time, by inventing strategies to enhance population health, and by leading in a manner that has impact and ensures that we fulfill the ideals of our profession.

My second “day job” is serving as editor-in-chief of Academic Psychiatry, a journal that is similar in its mission to Academic Medicine, but focuses more on the disciplines of psychiatry, psychology, and behavioral sciences. I fell in love with the work of an editor when I was an intern in psychiatry and the then-editor of Academic Medicine, Addeane Caelleigh, gave me the opportunity to guest edit a special issue of the journal focused on ethics training in medical education. Other than my stint as editor of my high school newspaper, this was my first real experience with the work of an editor. It sounds corny, but my professional life changed because of this extraordinary experience with Academic Medicine twenty years ago.

My final “day job” is conducting research that focuses on ethics and policy issues in clinical care and research involving vulnerable populations. My earliest work pertained to medical student health, illness, and the link with professionalism and compassion. It is exciting to see this important area develop to the point where the wellbeing of physicians and physicians-in-training is becoming understood for its significance in the optimal care of patients and patient care outcomes. My first NIH-funded study looked at informed consent in clinical research involving people with diverse physical and mental illnesses, such as HIV, cancer, diabetes, schizophrenia, depression, and anxiety. My later work has explored the ethical use of genetic and health information in the workplace, on rural and urban health disparity issues related to stigma, and specific ethical issues in genetic research involving vulnerable groups. All of this work engages with broad stakeholders and seeks to bring forward underrepresented perspectives. I feel fortunate to have been able to perform work that has been inspired by my patients and my students over the years.

I also write and edit books and textbooks in the areas of professionalism and ethics, clinical psychiatry, and innovative research approaches, such as community-based participatory research. Beyond these topics, mentorship and leadership in academic medicine has emerged as a central theme in my scholarship over the past decade. This work is wonderful because it involves writing and working with language. I love the quote by Isaac Asimov in which he said that if he knew he only had six minutes to live, he would type a little faster! I get this. A good day for me will always mean that I had the chance to write. A great day is one in which I have been able to craft a wonderful sentence, taking an experience or idea and making it clear through the precise use of narrative.

2. What gaps do you see in today’s scholarship?

Frankly, there are so many gaps in the academic medicine scholarship that it is hard to create a thick enough catalog. Many issues encountered in academic medicine merit deep inquiry, and even more require or would benefit from relevant empirical evidence.

One main barrier to the advancement of scholarship across academic medicine has been the lack of appropriate funding for research on education, organizational best practices, and practices and policies that have outcomes pertaining to human health. Other barriers include the lack of sufficient interdisciplinary engagement that would allow robust methods from the social and quantitative sciences to shape our thinking and to strengthen our approaches to investigation.

I am worried that the pressures in academic medicine are so great that faculty, especially clinical faculty, are working to the point of exhaustion and in isolation. Our capacity to reflect on our practices in real time—let alone to innovate or to mount careful studies to document and test the impact of our work—is being lost. So many of our nation’s approaches to governance in medicine and in medical education should be studied so that we can better understand their impact, and better articulate their value in fostering the health of individuals, communities, and populations-at-large.

3. Why do you read Academic Medicine?

I have read Academic Medicine for more than two decades, and I love its mission as a peer-reviewed academic journal that “serves as an international forum for the exchange of ideas, information, and strategies that address the major challenge facing the academic medicine community as it strives to carry out its missions in the public interest.” Perfect!

The combination of perspective pieces and commentaries, empirical studies, review pieces, and special features, such as AM Last Page, is balanced and always very high caliber. Every issue touches upon leadership, professional development, and important aspects of the public accountability of medical schools, academic hospitals, and health care systems. Learners, teachers, and leaders find value in the work presented in the journal. The theme issues have, in my view, special and enduring value to the field of medicine.

As an author, reviewer, and editorial board member of the journal, I also appreciate that the journal stands for integrity in the field of medicine through its policies and practices. I tremendously admire the fact that the journal is a publication of the AAMC, but that there is clear editorial independence. Submissions are evaluated on the basis of their quality, clarity, and rigor—true excellence, rather than conformity to a particular politic. The journal, in my view, is impeccable in this respect, and in many others!

4. What issues will we be reading about in five years?

I hope to be reading about:

  • The expanding numbers of brilliant applicants to medical schools and about how the physician-scientist “pipeline” is flowing rapidly.
  • The improvements in care and, as a result, the enhanced quality of life experienced by people with severe and disabling conditions.
  • “Smart” health care systems that are oriented around patients, not around what was once characterized as the “medical-industrial complex” and completely devoid of humanity.
  • The eradication of stigma associated with mental illness, addictions, and infectious diseases, as we have seen in the past century of enlightenment about cancer.
  • Evidence-based best practices in medical education that allow young physicians to embody and sustain the highest aspirations of our profession.
  • Essays inspired by Francis Peabody and William Osler.
  • Brilliant scholarship of my mentees and, with any luck, the writing of my children who awe and challenge me at every turn.

5. What book(s) are you reading right now?

I am working on three edited books right now. Every day I am reading chapter drafts, including manuscripts about how international medical graduates can flourish in the rapidly-evolving health care systems in the United States, about professionalism and ethics in the care of veterans, and about optimal approaches to leadership and negotiation in academic medicine. I just finished reading The Myths of Happiness by Sonia Lyubomirsky, which provides an interesting overview of recent social science literature and, in a very intuitive and engaging way, disrupts many of the inaccurate beliefs people have about how to find joy in their lives. I also just finished Creatures of a Day, the newest book by my treasured colleague, Irving Yalom. It is a beautiful text in which each chapter tells a story of psychotherapy, told from the perspective of an astute, insightful, and very human psychiatrist who shares his inner process. He makes plain the way in which this unique doctor-patient relationship can be transformative. I am also reading, How the French Invented Love by Marilyn Yalom, Irv’s wife of fifty years, which is quite a page-turner! Another recent favorite was Geography of Thought by Richard Nesbitt, which was especially salient for me in the entrepreneurial leadership space of Silicon Valley. Last week, spending lots of time traveling on planes, I read two David Baldacci “airport” best sellers, which were completely addictive. Tonight I have the delicious chance to crack open Donna Leon’s newest detective novel!

]]>
2696