Sneak Peek: Recording Medical Students’ Encounters with Standardized Patients Using Google Glass: Providing End-of-Life Clinical Education

Here’s a preview of a soon-to-be-published innovation report by Jeffery Tully and colleagues.

Recording Medical Students’ Encounters with Standardized Patients Using Google Glass: Providing End-of-Life Clinical Education

Jeffrey Tully, MD, Christian Dameff, MD, Susan Kaib, MD, and Maricela Moffitt, MD, MPH

Abstract

Problem
Medical education today frequently includes standardized patient (SP) encounters to teach history-taking, physical exam, and communication skills. However, traditional wall-mounted cameras, used to record video for faculty and student feedback and evaluation, provide a limited view of key nonverbal communication behaviors during clinical encounters.

Approach
In 2013, 30 second-year medical students participated in an end-of-life module that included SP encounters in which the SPs used Google Glass to record their first-person perspective. Students reviewed the Google Glass video and traditional videos then completed a post-encounter, self-evaluation survey and a follow-up survey about the experience.

Outcomes
Google Glass was used successfully to record 30 student/SP encounters. One temporary Google Glass hardware failure was observed. Of the 30 students, 7 (23%) reported a “positive, non-distracting experience”; 11 (37%) a “positive, initially distracting experience”; 5 (17%) a “neutral experience”; 3 (10%) a “negative experience”; and 4 (13%) opted to withhold judgment until they reviewed the videos but reported Google Glass as “distracting.” According to follow-up survey responses, 16 students (of 23; 70%) found Google Glass “worth including in the [clinical skills program]” while 7 (30%) did not.

Next Steps
Google Glass can be used to video record students during SP encounters and provides a novel perspective for the analysis and evaluation of their interpersonal communication skills and nonverbal behaviors. Next steps include a larger, more rigorous comparison of Google Glass versus traditional videos and expanded use of this technology in other aspects of the clinical skills training program.

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